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Adelphi Technology Inc.
2003 E. Bayshore Road
Redwood City, CA 94063

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Email: info@adelphitech.com

News

News

12/2015 Neutrons from Adelphi DD108 Generator are “Stand Ins” for Dark Matter!

Using a DD108 Neutron Generator from Adelphi Technology, “We have improved the sensitivity of LUX (dark matter detector) by more than a factor of 20 for low-mass dark matter particles, significantly enhancing our ability to look for WIMPs,” says Prof. Richard Gaitskell (Brown University).

 “One calibration technique used neutrons as “stand-ins” for dark matter particles. Bouncing neutrons off the xenon atoms allows scientists to quantify how the LUX detector responds to the recoiling process.

“It’s like a giant game of pool with a neutron as the cue ball and the xenon atoms as the stripes and solids,” Prof. Gaitskell said. “We can track the neutron to deduce the details of the xenon recoil, and calibrate the response of LUX better than anything previously possible.”

The nature of the interaction between neutrons and xenon atoms is thought to be very similar to the interaction between dark matter and xenon. “It’s just that dark matter particles interact very much more weakly—about a million-million-million-million times more weakly,” Gaitskell said.

See: “World’s most sensitive dark matter detector gets better


12/2015 Statements from the LUX Dark Matter group about the DD108

Using an Adelphi model DD108 generator as calibration source “has, by orders of magnitude, blown away all other methods of dark matter detector calibration.” “The generator has operated 24-7 for approximately 1000 hours with no problems.  We are very pleased with the generators operation.”  James Verbus, Graduate Student, Brown University, LUX experiment, Nov. 2015.

“We have improved the sensitivity of LUX by more than a factor of 20 for low-mass dark matter particles, significantly enhancing our ability to look for WIMPs,” said Prof. Richard Gaitskell, Professor of Physics at Brown University and co-spokesperson for the LUX experiment. “It is vital that we continue to push the capabilities of our detector in the search for the elusive dark matter particles.”

 "The LUX dark matter experiment, currently the world's most sensitive dark matter detector, recently announced new results that improve upon its already world leading sensitivity to weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs).  An Adelphi Technologies, Inc. DD108 neutron generator was used as a mono-energetic neutron source for a new type of in situ calibration for WIMP-like interactions in the LUX detector. This new calibration using the DD108 directly contributes to a more than a 20 x increase the LUX detector's sensitivity to low mass WIMPs."

See “Improved WIMP scattering limits from the LUX experiment

See:  “Research moves toward detection of dark matter particles, Calibration with neutrons allows for more accuracy in detecting low-energy particles


11/12/2015 Adelphi wins a R&D100 2015 award for “A Hybrid Neutron Generator” in the IT/Electrical category

“Although compact fusion generators have been around since the 1950s, their uses have been restricted to a limited number of applications, mainly due to their low yield, high neutron energies (2.5 MeV) and short product lifetimes. Adelphi Technology Inc.’s Model DD110M Hybrid Neutron Generator marries the usually low-yield DD fusion reaction generator to a highly efficient ECR ion source (usually reserved for high-current LINAC-based sources) and an integrated target and moderator that efficiently moderates the fast 2.5 MeV neutrons to thermal energies (less than 0.25 eV) in a very small volume, resulting in a high thermal flux. >Read more


10/26/2015 Finalist in R&D 100 award 2015 magazine.

Adelphi is in the final competition for the R&D100 2015 award in the IT/Electrical category. “Model DD110M Hybrid Neutron Generator” is a finalist in the R&D100 Award IT/Electrical category. Winners to be given award on November 12-13, 2015 in Las Vegas.
>More Information


08/19/2015 Articles in R&D Magazine: Interview with Dr. Melvin Piestrup from Adelphi on a past (2012) R&D100 award:

Lindsay Hock of R&D magazine interviewed (in the fall of 2015) Dr. M. A. Piestrup on the importance of R&D 100 2012 Award to Adelphi Technology. “Every Wednesday, R&D Magazine features a R&D 100 Flashback, chosen from our R&D 100 archive of winners. This week’s flashback is Adelphi Technology Inc.’s High Output Neutron Generator DD-100 Series, which won a R&D 100 Award in 2012.”
>Read interview


6/17/2015 New Magnetic Lenses for the collimation and focusing of neutrons have been fabricated.

New magnetic lenses have been fabricated by Adelphi Technology that can efficiently collect and collimate cold neutrons. Unlike the material lenses now being used, the new lenses will have larger apertures with no intervening material that can scatter and absorb the neutrons. When used in various experiments on neutron beamlines, they can help determine the sizes and structures of objects on the nanoscale (1-100 nm) of polymer molecules, biological molecules, pores in rocks, and defect structures in metals and ceramics.


5/20/2014 New Beamline Optics from LENS and Adelphi Technology Inc. improves Small Angle Scattering (SANS) at Neutron Facilities.

Neutron beams are a powerful materials science probe that provides unique information about the structure of matter. The Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) of Indiana University’s Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM) and Adelphi have developed a novel Superconducting Wollaston Prism (HiTc-Wollaston Prism instrument) for Spin Echo Scattering Angle Measurement (SESAME). Critical for determining the structures of matter such as plastics, the HiTc-Wollaston Prism instrument is used to obtain accurate structural measurements over length scales from nanometers to 20 microns, which is inaccessible to conventional small angle scattering (SANS) instruments.  A magnetic Wollaston prism can spatially split a polarized neutron beam into two beams with different neutron spin states, in a manner analogous to an optical Wollaston prism. Such a Wollaston prism can be used to encode the trajectory of neutrons into the Larmor phase associated with their spin degree of freedom. This encoding can be used for neutron phase-contrast radiography and in spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME). The new prism uses high temperature superconducting (HiTc) coils and Meissner screens.

See: “Superconducting magnetic Wollaston prism for neutron spin encoding,” F. Li, S. R. Parnell, W. A. Hamilton, B. B. Maranville, T. Wang, R. Semerad, D. V. Baxter, J. T. Cremer, and R. Pynn; Review of Scientific Instruments  85, 053303 (2014).
>More Information


3/2014 Adelphi Generator Helps in Search for Dark Matter!

An Adelphi Model DD108 has been installed 4850' underground at Sanford Underground Research Facility* and used to successfully tested the sensitivity of the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) dark matter detector. Since neutrons have neutral charge, they easily pass into the detector, mimicking the non-interacting dark matter particles. The DD108 produces fast neutrons that are introduced into the detector in order to test the LUX detector's sensitivity. The detector is located in the center of an 8-m diameter water tank (steel wall in picture).
>Read more


3/2014 Liquid noble gas (LNG) Particle Detectors (High Efficiency, Cost Effective, Large Volume Detectors of Gamma Radiation and Neutrons)

Together with its collaborators, Yale University and Rapiscan Inc., Adelphi is developing large volume detectors for homeland security and medical imaging. These detectors use Liquid Noble Gas (LNG) such as liquid argon to provide the most cost effective method of achieving large detector volumes. Since the scintillation material, a noble gas, is immune to chemical degradation, these detectors are extremely radiation resistant. Three prototypes have been constructed and tested. All three can detect gamma radiation from 100 keV to 10 MeV and neutrons in the fast and thermal energy regions.
>Read more


12/2013 Adelphi Technology's Model DD109X receives the prestigious R&D 100 award for 2013

Adelphi Technology Inc. and its collaborator, the University of Florida, have received the 2013 R&D 100 award for their development of a "High Flux Fast Neutron Source, Model DD-109X."
>Read more


3/4/2013 New Lenses for Collimating Neutrons: DOE Announces Phase II SBIR Award of $1M for Adelphi Technology

Adelphi Technology Inc. is pleased to confirm that it is the recipient of a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research Grant from the US Department of Energy. The title of the program is "Compound Magnetic Lens for Providing Focused, Polarized Neutrons." Dr. Jay Theodore (Ted) Cremer, Adelphi Technology's Chief Scientist, is the principal investigator.

The magnetic lenses can be used to collect and collimate neutrons primarily at large neutron source facilities. Unlike the material lenses now being used, the new lenses will have larger apertures with no intervening material that can scatter and absorb the neutrons. When used in various experiments on neutron beamlines, they can help determine the sizes and structures of objects on the nanoscale (1-100nm) of polymer molecules, biological molecules, pores in rocks, and defect structures in metals and ceramics.

Adelphi Technology Inc. has a long history of developing compound refractive lenses for the collection, collimation of x-rays and neutrons. Specialty lenses for your application are available for sale and Adelphi's scientific staff will help you determine the lenses required characteristics.


1/7/2013 New Neutron Prism for Nano-scale Measurements: DOE Announces Phase I STTR Award for Adelphi Technology

Along with its partner Indiana University, Adelphi Technology Inc. is pleased to confirm that it is the recipient of a Phase I Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Grant from the US Department of Energy. The title of the program is "Superconducting Wollaston Prism for Spin Echo Scattering Angle Measurement". Dr. Jay Theodore (Ted) Cremer, Adelphi Technology's Chief Scientist, is the principal investigator. Professor Roger Pynn is the originator of this technology and is the Project Director for Indiana University. https://www.indiana.edu/~sesame/WebSite/CryoPrism.html

The proposed Wollaston Prism will greatly extend the measurement capabilities of neutron scattering instruments. The end product is a more compact, lower-cost instrument capable of measuring a wider range of structures with increased signal. By extending the range of structural objects that can be studied, the proposed instrument will open new fields of material science studies. Possibilities include visualizing the later stages of precipitate coarsening in metal alloys, cavity growth in fatigued metals and ceramics as well as many aggregation and self-assembly phenomena. Applications are in petrochemicals (colloidal and aggregate dynamics), biotechnology and medicine (membranes, macromolecules), and industry (metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, electrolytes in fuel cells, magnetic sensors and memory).

Adelphi Technology Inc. has a long history of developing neutron optics for commercial and scientific applications. Specialty optics for your applications are available for sale and Adelphi's scientific staff will help you determine the optics required characteristics.


1/7/2013 Large Volume, position-sensitive Detectors for Medical and Nuclear Physics Applications: DOE Announces Phase I STTR Award for Adelphi Technology

Along with its partners Yale University and Rapiscan Systems, Adelphi Technology Inc. is pleased to confirm that it is the recipient of a Phase I Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Grant from the US Department of Energy. The title of the program is "Efficient, high resolution, position sensitive liquid argon detectors". Dr. Charles Gary, Adelphi Technology's Vice President of Operations, is the principal investigator. Professor Daniel McKinsey is the originator of this technology and is the Project Director for Yale University. http://mckinseygroup.physics.yale.edu/pixey/

Based on earlier research by both Yale and Adelphi a position-sensitive liquid argon detector is being developed for a range of nuclear physics and medical applications. The detector presents a unique and broad range of capabilities, including high efficiency, excellent time, spatial and energy resolution, and it can be readily expanded to large collection volumes. It will provide excellent particle (gammas and charged particles) tracking and energy resolution when operated in a time projection chamber mode with both light and charge readout. A layered array of detector planes will be built to create a medical imaging detector for nuclear medicine that could measure the position and direction of gammas from a patient, dramatically increasing imaging performance and reducing patient dose.

Adelphi Technology Inc. has a long history of developing neutron and x-ray detectors for commercial and scientific applications. Please contact us for more information.


7/2012 Adelphi Technology’s New Microwave-Driven Neutron Generators Receive the Prestigious R&D 100 Award for 2012

Adelphi Technology Inc. and its collaborator, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), have received the 2012 R&D 100 award for their development of “High Output Neutron Generators, DD100 Series.”
>Read more


9/23/2011 Imaging using fast neutrons from an Adelphi generator and detector

Adelphi has developed a fast neutron camera that can be used with its DD-109 neutron generator. The camera field of view can vary from 10 x 10 to 25 x 25 cm2. We have imaged large hydrogen-bearing objects such as a cell phone that are hidden inside a woman purse.  The overall image resolution was 2.5-mm, which was determined by a “knife-edge” measurement and favorably compared to a Monte Carlo simulation.   Images of objects were obtained in 5-50 minutes by placing them close to the camera at distances of 1.5 to 3.2 meter from the neutron source. The Model DD-109 generator produces 109 n/s from the DD fusion reaction at a small target. The combination of the DD-fusion generator and electronic camera permits both small laboratory and field-portable imaging of hydrogen-rich materials or voids embedded in high density materials (e.g. uranium, lead, iron).

A paper was submitted to Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: J. T. Cremer, D. L. Williams, M.J. Fuller, C. K. Gary, M. A. Piestrup, D.R. Faber, J. H. Vainionpaa, R. H. Pantell and J. Feinstein, “Large area imaging of hydrogenous materials using fast neutrons from a DD fusion generator”, Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section  A, submitted Sept 2011.
A preprint is available from the principle author, Dr. J. T. Cremer. ted@adelphitech.com

 

10/3/2011 Fast pulse cutoff measured

Adelphi can now pulse its fast neutron generators with pulse rates from DC to 20 kHz. Recently we have demonstrated pulse cutoff rates of down to noise level in less than 5 µS. This permits an increased signal to noise after the pulse of any low intensity radiation or particle emission that has been delayed/or and initiated by the fast neutron pulse. This has application for the identification of small amounts of atomic matter and their fractional weights in large composite volumes and, therefore, useful in the mining and minerals processing industries. For further information please contact Dr. Charles K. Gary: cgary@adelphitech.com